In 1920, the Rhode Island Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RISPCA) was bequeathed an estate from Sarah E. Gardiner, an African American woman from Newport that provided them the means to build their first headquarters at 372 West Fountain Street in Providence in 1925.  Formed in 1870, the RISPCA is the third oldest humane organization in the United States and was fifty-five years old at the time this structure was built.  The RISPCA headquarters and shelter were located in this structure until 1982.  This architecturally intact building with its handsome Mission Style façade is a unique example of Providence's vibrant twentieth-century commercial architecture.  The building is listed on the Providence Industrial and Commercial Buildings Historic District and is located in one of the City's designated Redevelopment Project Areas. 

Support the Preservation Resource Center Capital Fund!
Help us renovate and support the Preservation Resource Center by making a tax deductible donation. The Providence Revolving Fund is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization. You may make a secure, tax deductible donation online via PayPal by clicking on the link below. Or, you may call Kim Smith at (401) 272-2760 or email: smith@revolvingfund.org.


 








The Preservation Resource Center
In 2006, the Providence Revolving Fund purchased 372 West Fountain Street and has renovated the 5,500 square foot building . The Revolving Fund’s administrative offices now occupy the second floor and the first floor will house the new Preservation Resource Center with conference room, community space, preservation library and an architectural salvage recycling program.  The new location enables the Revolving Fund to expand its existing services; develop new preservation initiatives and be more physically accessible to its targeted neighborhoods, encompassing five of Providence’s National Register Historic Districts.  

The Preservation Resource Center will offer assistance with: rehabilitation services; loans and grants; project management; referrals to architects, contractors and craftsmen; lead paint abatement; building code violations; state and federal historic tax credits; historical research; National Register nominations and the historic district process.  The Center will have product displays of building materials that are compliant with historic district regulations; a reference library with computer work stations for online research and access to online preservation forums; historic paint color consultation with an interactive software program; “green” product ideas for historic properties; historic preservation seminars and do-it-yourself trainings for homeowners. 

Financial Support
The Preservation Resource Center has received financial support from the 1772 Foundation, the City of Providence, the Rhode Island Foundation, Champlin Foundations, Textron, Citizens Bank Foundation, Bank RI, the National Trust for Historic Preservation and the Rhode Island Historical Preservation and Heritage Commission.